Posts in category Buttonwood’s notebook


Business and financeButtonwood’s notebook

Where did the inflation go?

THE strength of the global economy is one reason why the stockmarket has started 2018 in buoyant mood (with the Dow passing 25,000). At some point, in any expansion, businesses find it harder to recruit workers or get the materials they need; these bottlenecks cause wages and prices to rise. Central banks then start to tighten monetary policy, a process that can eventually turn the market (and the economy) down.

After many years of ultra-low interest rates, the Federal Reserve has started to tighten monetary policy. There were three rate rises in 2017, and three are expected this year. The idea is to tighten gradually and (keep ahead of the curve) so that inflation does not accelerate so fast that a very sharp monetary tightening is needed.

The problem is that inflation remains hard to spot. Continue reading

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Business and financeButtonwood’s notebook

Picking a fund manager? The odds aren't great

WHO wants mediocrity? That is what a lot of people say when the subject of index-tracking, or passive fund management, comes up. They would rather choose a fund manager (an active manager in the jargon) who tries to beat the market by picking the best stocks. It does sound like a good idea.

The tricky bit is finding the right manager. The temptation is to look at past performance but fund managers rarely beat the market for long.

The average fund manager is always going to struggle to beat the market (this is a separate argument from whether markets are “efficient”). That is because the index reflects the performance of the average investor before costs. In a world dominated by professional fund managers, there aren’t enough amateurs for the professionals to beat. Even the hedge funds, those supposed “masters of the universe”, haven’t been able to do it; Warren Buffett looks set Continue reading

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Business and financeButtonwood’s notebook

The bond market defies the doomsters

THE yield on the ten-year Treasury bond fell to 2.13% on August 28th, after North Korea fired a missile over Japanese territory. Investors tend to buy government bonds when they feel risk-averse. That will have come as a surprise to those commentators who have called the bond market a “bubble” that is sure to burst; one British magazine made this a cover story back in September 2001. Every time the ten-year yield falls close to 2%, press references to a bond bubble seem to increase (see chart; the yield is inverted).

It is not just the press. Investors have been cautious about bonds for a while; the vast preponderance of fund managers polled by Bank of America Merrill Lynch in January had a smaller holding than usual in the asset class, just as they did in January 2016. But while inflation stays subdued, and central banks maintain short-term rates at historically low levels, government bonds seem able to attract buyers. Japan’s government bond yields have been very low since the start of the millennium; those betting on a crash in…Continue reading

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